because art makes the world a better place
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new media + performance

 
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The Space Between, 2015-2016, Anchorage, AK

Two Channel HD Video Installation,  5:20 min. (color, sound)  

Projected in a space elevated 20 inches onto two wall surfaces measuring 8' x 16' with a 60° joining angle.

This work is a reflection; a wondering of the past, present and future. It brings into question what is real and what is not. The relationship between space and time is unrecognizable. By negotiating the unknown, we balance and navigate through uncertain times. We face solitude and spells of loneliness.  The value of this work lies in the suggestion of comfort, of knowing that with human connection, we are not alone. 

Cinematography: Slavik Boyekcheko and Travis Gilmour: Video Dads, Corvalis, OR

Video Editing & Production: Travis Gilmour

Original Sound Composition: Kyle Hanson (accordian) and Lori Goldston (cello), Seattle, WA

Dress Tailor: Thomas Darst, Seattle, WA

Make-up: Maria Comacho, Anchorage, AK

 
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Tempted Still, 2013-2014, Haukijärvi, Finland

5:07 min. Short Film (color, sound)

La Unica Sepia Creativa: Myriam Guillamon and Jose Bahamonde, Barcelona, Spain

I worked for a month at Arteles developing a costume and character. I experimented with props and brainstormed ideas for a narrative searching through what was unfamiliar and reflecting upon being somewhere so isolated and far away from home.  

The following month I met Myriam and Jose. We shared ideas regarding myth and reality, femininity and expectations, and a need to experience the natural world. With histories in visual arts, performance, cinematography and  animation we discovered the strength of combining conceptual ideas and skills.

We worked together during the remainder of our time at Arteles and continued to develop and finish the project post-residency.

This is a story about isolation and solitude; pattern and ritual; uncertainty and uncomfortable transitions; when beauty and grace seem infinitely far away. 

It is inspired by living in the north and experiencing the relationship between place and navigating through it in the most challenging times.

 
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Weathered, 2012, Anchorage Museum, Anchorage, AK

2 1/2 hour performance

In this performance of Weathered, Amy Johnson continues a dialogue between artist and viewer to expose deeply rooted ideals born from myths and fairytales that have been glamorized throughout history and now saturate modern day life. Living in an environment with extreme weather, drastic changes in light and dark, where we mostly walk on unstable frozen ground we are challenged to be resilient and persevere not just through daily life but also through a seemingly inhabitable space. By using place as a metaphor, Johnson deconstructs the romantic perception of life in the north and conveys her experiences of solitude and endurance in an unfamiliar yet enchanting world.

 

 
 
 
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Queen Bee, 2011, Steel Gallery, Seattle, WA

1 1/2 hour performance + site specific installation

…the queen bee’s place lies between head and heart, and the drones become the cells, which are constantly renewed.  The whole builds a unity, which has to function perfectly, but in a humane warm way through principles of cooperation and brotherhood.  
– Joseph Beuys, 1979

Queen Bee is a culmination of ideas and critique of fairytales with an investigation of their relevance to contemporary culture. Fairytales introduce an idyllic world.  They present narratives with trickery and darkness, but always conclude with happily ever after. This work suggests the seductive nature of getting lost in the attraction of beauty, and realizing the gruesome truths of myths.  My role as an artist and my motivation for working is to offer an empathetic response to the painful contrast of these dreams and our reality.

Considering the social norms of modern day and the roles that are associated with gender, Queen Bee reveals the history and questions the recurring themes connected to female socialization. My relation to the queen and her primary function of reproduction are a reflection of the expectations and responsibilities of women in our society.